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in relations between russia and the united states there, have been many successes, including the s.t.a.r.t. treaty, cooperation on afghanistan, iran, and north korea. civilian nuclear power, and other areas. but there have been notable differences over syria, missile defense, human rights, enforcement of intellectual property rights and con dufkt elections last month. both president put spin and president obama have called for a deepening of economic cooperation between the two countries. the russian state duma its expected to ratify russia's succession to the wto in june or july. we expect 30 days after that, roughly, that russia will become a member of the world trade organization. for the united states, to take advantage of the new market openings in the russian market, congress must pass legislation to grant russia permanent normal trade relations treatment. the panel today will focus on prospects for improving relations with russia, and how the wto process has prompted russia to take measures to open its economy, to more international trade and investment. we had timed this pa
the president of the united states is on the ground in afghanistan. of course, we are in afghanistan because the attacks of 9/11 and now we know that president obama is meeting with afghanistan's president karzai, an unannounced and secret visit until this moment. some describe the relationship between our president and president karzai as "complicated." which could be the unstatement of the day. casey in point: a u.s. government released yesterday. new details of the level of corruption in afghanistan. and the unthinkable waste of billions upon billions of american tax dollars. officials in afghanistan are stealing american money according to the report. the afghan attorney general's office avoids prosecuting high profile corruption cases among other things. that's the situation as the president is on the ground if afghanistan our chief white house correspondent is at the white house. did you get any idea of this? and what do we expect to accomplish? >>reporter: the president's schedule was wide open all day leaving the possibility that he could have been going s
in the united states senate. he can start by putting americans to work by aproviding the keystone pipeline. he could do something about sky high gas prices by increasing american energy production and he could empower small businesses by cutting red tape and reempleg the regulatory process. he could deal with our crippling debt by encouraging democrats to pass a duj et. look, we want to work with the president, but it's about time that he gets serious, focused on jobs, focused on our economy and enough with the gimmicks. >>. [ inaudible ] >> doing a very good job. i do believe when it comes to fast and furious, we've got to get to the bottom of what happened and who's responsible. and the committee is doing that and i'm supporting their efforts. >> does that mean you are sea supporting -- he is in the process of right now writing a resolution you're supporting a resolution. >> i'm supporting in their efforts to hold those people in the department of justice accountable for what happened. the committee has work to do. they know what they have to do. they're pursuing a lot of unanswered question
two times the united states has hosted nato summits were in 1978 and 1999 which, of course, was the 50th anniversary during president clinton's term. as i've said, 61 countries as well as the eu, the united nations and the world bank will be in attendance. they'll be a different grouping, if you will, of countries during the course of the day. as i said, the president will fly to chicago on saturday evening. the first meeting that he'll have on sunday will be with president karzai of afghanistan. obviously, an important meeting because a central focus of the summit will be on afghanistan and afghanistan's future. so the first meeting of the day appropriately is going to be with president karzai of afghanistan. the president will then move into various, a series of nato immediatings. initial meeting with just the nato allies at 28. that evening, on sunday evening, the nato allies will meet at soldier field for a working dinner and that will be leaders plus one adviser. on monday morning, the summit will continue at mccormick place with discussions on afghanistan and this will be a broad
to testify on the nato summit which the united states is proud to be hosting in chicago on may 20th and may 21st. with your permission, senator, i would like to submit my full statement and summarize my comments here. >> we appreciate and without objection the full statement will be in the record. >> i appreciate the support and the sustained recognition of the significance of this alliance, transatlantic security. this chicago summit will be the first on american soil in 13 years and the first ever outside of washington. in adang to the community to showcase our nation's great cities a symbol of nato to the united states. it is also an opportunity to underscore to the american people the continued value of this alliance and security challenges we face today. nearly 18 months ago the allies unveiled a new strategic concept for focus in the 21st century. building on the decisions taking in lisbon, the allies have three objectives. was a capabilities and partnerships and if i might, i'd like to say a few words about these. on afghanistan the isaf coalition has prevented that country from serv
, it david miliband, a former u.k. ambassador to the united states, and my former british colleague at nato. we have widespread support for this report. we are very grateful for their intellectual import and personal support, so that is what i wanted to say. at the order is for us to have a brief conversation, and then we will be happy to take whatever questions you have. thank you. [applause] >> thank you very much for that. first of all, it is important to state that the atlantic council as a council does not take a point of view on anything, because it would just be too hard to get all of the members to agree, but i do think one thing we all agree on is a strong alliance and an enduring alliance, and this report points us in that direction. let me ask probably just two questions, and i will go to the audience right away, and two of the more controversial points, clearly, what you're saying on germany is tough, and it is saying it to a germany where many germans would argue, are we not doing the most important thing we could possibly do for the future of europe right now, which is aiding
was going to be the great seal of the united states. and a certain group of american leaders thought that it should be the bald eagle but another group said no, the image of the united states, the seal should show moses leading the children of israel out of bondage and into the promised land. there was this heated debate. america came this close to having moses as its national symbol. you got the folically challenged bird instead. but the authors of the moses seal were none other than thomas jefferson and benjamin franklin. so they had internalized the biblical narrative. now, for many of this generation of founding mothers and founding fathers, the fact that they were the new israel meant that they had a kinship relationship with the old israel, the jewish people. it meant since they were -- they had inherited a new promised land. they had a connection with the old promised land. and they concluded that to be good christians, to be good americans, it was their divinely ordained duty to help the old israel go back and restore their ancient kingdom to help god fulfill his promises to
ended in 2009 but most did not feel it but people in all three states feel the united states should get out of afghanistan by a 2-1 margin. but most approve of the job that obama is doing there. a gender gap is on display. it is too close to call in florida where the president is down but it is 13 points in ohio. and he has a 17-point edge among women in pennsylvania. >>reporter: thank you on the perfect strange day in washington, dc. another former aide to john edwards on the witness stand today. he said he overher the foam presidential candidate asking his mistress whether her baby bump was showing. the foam aide here in the blue tie and glasses said in 26 fix he saw the mistress get off the elevator on the same floor as john edwards and the foam aide says the mistress told him she and john edwards were madly if love. and the next day the aide says john edwards called him to deny he was having an affair and told him rielle hunter was crazy. not long after that run in the aide said campaign staffers had to stay in a different hotel floor from the presidential candidate, but one day in
>>> 30 minutes from now the president of the united states will address the american people. >> welcome to cnn's breaking news coverage of president obama's surprise visit to afghanistan. the president will be telling us about the new strategic partnership agreement he has just signed with afghanistan's president outlining the relationship between the united states and afghanistan after the withdrawal of u.s. forces at the end of 2014. white house officials tell us the timing was driven by the negotiations over that agreement at an upcoming nato summit. critics will say it is about politics. everyone knows today is the anniversary of the raid in pakistan that killed osama bin laden. on the ground, do people there -- are they aware that president obama is on the ground? >> reporter: late in the afternoon the sun went down there was a report on afghan media suggesting that he was already in kabul. since then we have seen absolute silence across the city occasionally by helicopters and that is presumably some part of the president in and out of the capital. the speech we are ab
for the united states and europe. i might add is also a great pleasure to see the french ambassador here this afternoon. thank you for the support that you gave 2 brookings, and that your predecessors gave to fiona hill, was -- and she would be addressing you from this lectern at the date of this conference, but she was locked into a commitment in beijing. but i want to assure you on behalf of brookings and the united states and europe that this does not represent a strategic pivot on the part of the institution or the center to east asia. it has been our pleasure, and i hope of some contribution to the policy community in partnership with the heinrich boll's foundation to bring the conference to you on an annual basis. and i think it is particularly appropriate that we should have filled with us today. -- phil with us today. he is secretary of state of european affairs and is responsible for u.s. policy toward about 50 countries, as well as three key -- and i would add to that currently, someone challenged international institutions -- the north of montreal organization, the european u
that has helped expedite this thing with terrorism and their attacks on the united states? is it one person or many? who is responsible? >> i don't think there's a nickel's worth of difference between the two policies in terms of foreign policy. the first president bush, mr. clinton, the sec and mr. bush and mr. obama have made it their business to light to the american people, to insist we are being attacked because of what we think here in north america or how we lived rather than with united states government has done. the core of the problem is intervention in other people's business. part of that intervention is unfortunately necessary. we have to defend the saudis and operate because we depend on oil. our support of israel and our intervention in south sudan, the relentless intervention of the united states on issues that are not very important to it is because of what is going on and it is a bipartisan stimulus. it's not just one person. until we stop that war think about stopping at, there is no chance to stop this war and that is why so much about kite has spread so greatly since 2
in history the united states needs latin america more than latin america needs the united states? now comcast your mind back -- cast your mind back to a decade ago, that question would seem absurd. the united states was the undisputed heavyweight champion of the world, the most powerful country economically, politically, militarily. why on earth would he need anyone, let alone a continent known for its economic crises, its political instability for having almost no global clout? well, how times have changed. and how used we have become to the fact of change. there's an old jewish joke i heard probably about 5000 times when i was growing up, and it's set in eastern europe in the 19 century in a period when borders were changing very rapidly. and the story goes that a woman is taking up washington in a remote area and the soldier rides up and he declares old woman, from this day forth, this man -- this land is no longer politically his imperial russian. she watches him go. thank god, i couldn't stand another polish winter. [laughter] thank you for laughing. i will pass those laughs on to my fat
the president of the united states turned out to be a dlib fabrication because for sduecury reasons he made a trip under the veil of secrecy. this is standard operating procedure for presidents visiting america's various war zones. shortly after the 2008 election in which he was elected president, after the election but before the new president had been sworn in in december of 2008, then still president george w. bush took one of these surprise trips the, unannounced trips to background. it was december 14th, 2008. that's when this happened. >> yes. everybody calm down for a minute. first of all, thank you for apologizing on behalf of the iraqi people. it doesn't bother me. if you want the facts, it's a size 10 shoe that he threw. >> boy, if you were not surprised enough to find out that the president had surprise, gone to iraq, the president having a shoe hurled at him was definitely a surprise that day. when you look at the official transcript from this, we posted a link to it on our blog tonight. when you go through the transcript of this event, when you get to the part where the guy thr
was in baghdad was to sign the agreement which committed the united states to end our war in iraq. it was an agreement that president obama then followed through on. the last u.s. troops left iraq in december. today, in afghanistan it was not a status of forces agreement. it was called a strategic partnership agreement between the u.s. and afghan government but the idea is the same. it's to commit both countries to a plan by which the united states will end our war there. >> today i signed an agreement between the united states and afghanistan that defines a new relationship between our countries. a future in which afghans are responsible for the security of their nation and we build an equal partnership between two states. as we move forward some people will ask why we need a firm timeline. the answer is clear. our goal is not to build a country in america's image or to eradicate the taliban. these objectives would require in many years, many more dollars and most importantly many more american lives. our goal is to destroy al qaeda and we on path to do exactly that. afghans want
that the president has landed safely in afghanistan, he flu there year night from the the united states. obviously he is there on the one year anniversary of the raid across the border in pakistan that led to the death of osama bin laden. we also know the president will address the nation tonight in the 7:00 hour, 7:30 p.m., he will address the nation from afghanistan. and we know while there he is scheduled to meet with the afghan president, hamid karzai and the two ledder leaders ared to sign a extstrategic agreemen between the two countries. this would create an alliance between the two countries essentially saying about this the years going forward when the u.s. combat troops are out of afghanistan, there would still be training and cooperation between the two countries. that has been morimportant to t united states to have a footprint in afghanistan going forward and as the country marks one year since the death of osama bin laden, there are still big questions about the security situation in afghanistan. you were talking about occasional problems with the taliban. and this is separate from the
the united states and europe remain each other's best parkhurst and that when the american president or european leader looks how the public and says pudu one call when there's a problem of the person on the other side of the cleantech. my judgment is that is not going to change anytime soon partly because of the affinity of interest of the values and also there aren't other options and even though there are emerging countries out your waist count on our european allies and to rely on our european allies more than we can count on a cost-cutting. at the same time i think it's clear that we are at the cusp of a major historic transition in the global landscape in which the world that nato represents his losing the primacy it enjoyed the last 200 years and if you look at the share of global product represented by nato and i would include japan because they are a part of the western world since world war ii we've gone from roughly 70% of the global product to 50% and we are headed towards 40% and that says to me the big security question of the day are about how we are going to manage th
home, bagram being a hub or many troops returning back to the united states and i think keen to try to suggest as he said a year ago the tide of war is still receding, choosing this anniversary, the death of bin laden, the man for americans the reason why they came to afghanistan, choosing the anniversary of his death to take this narrative an extra stage forwards and explaining exactly how america will tie up the loose ends of the decades-long war and how his presence will look like in the years ahead. >> nick what is the strategic partnership agreement? it doesn't talk about funding. those say this is more about, this isn't really, some saying kind of sets out the logistics of what's going to happen over the next ten years, after 2014. >> it's very strong on symbolism, not heavy on substance. it's important for america that it was signed, that it happened because for months there were outstanding issues that made it look like it may never come to fruition. it's important it was signed ahead of this vital summit in chicago in may, where nato allies have to put forward their contrib
i'm anderson cooper. we welcome our viewers across the united states and around the globe to the special report, president obama addressing the american people from afghanistan, talking about the future of u.s. troops there and we are going to bring that to you live. >> lots of news happening now, dramatic developments covering the president's surprise visit to afghanistan like no one else can. we have our reporters in afghanistan, in pakistan, in washington, in new york, we're watching all of this unfold, our own john king will give us an inside look at what it's like to be on a secret presidential trip to a war zone. he's been on one before, our own erin burnett looks at al qaeda's future and our christiane amanpour and fareed zakariazaka. >> the president took a helicopter to kabul and signed a strategic partnership agreement with president hamid karzai. it could mark the beginning of the end of the war there. listen. >> neither americans nor the afghan people asked for this war, yet for a decade we've stood together to drive al qaeda from its camps to battle an insurge
relations between the two countries. he will then make a televised speech to the united states, indeed to the entire world, in three and a half hours from now at 7:30 p.m. eastern time here in the united states. let's go straight to our white house correspondent brianna keilar. for this president, this is a huge deal. set the scene. >> reporter: this is a big deal, wolf. a trip by the president of the united states to a war zone like afghanistan is extraordinary and this is only the third time that president obama has made this trip. it's been over a year. the last time he was there was in december 2010 and furthermore, at the presidential palace which is where he is right now for brief remarks with president hamid karzai and to sign the strategic partnership agreement with afghanistan to talk about the u.s. relationship with afghanistan beyond 2014. that's extraordinary. the last time the president was in afghanistan in december of 2010 he could not make that trip from bagram air force base which is about 30 miles or so north of kabul to the palace because of weather concerns,
. it's to commit both countries to a plan by which the united states will end our war there. >> today i signed an agreement between the united states and afghanistan that defines a new relationship between our countries. a future in which afghans are responsible for the security of their nation and we build an equal partnership between two states. as we move forward some people will ask why we need a firm timeline. the answer is clear. our goal is not to build a country in america's image or to eradicate the taliban. these objectives would require in many years, many more dollars and most importantly many more american lives. our goal is to destroy al qaeda and we on path to do exactly that. afghans want to assert their sovereignty and build a lasting peace. the agreement we signed today sends a clear message to the afghan people. as you stand up, you will not stand alone. within this framework we'll work with the afghans to determine what support they need to accomplish two narrow security missions beyond 2014. counter terrorism, and continued training. we will not build permanent base
trade of the united states. and less than 2 point something of russian foreign trade. which suggests in turn that neither united states nor russia are to each other an important economic partner. just for example with our neighbor in ukraine our trade is 20% higher. with eu it is -- it is almost ten times hyper. -- ten times higher. so what it means, it means we are missing a good economic underpinning for political relations. and that leaves them still vulnerable to the politics of the day, to the crisises of the day, and, and unnecessarily so. we certainly have a lot of things that we have in common in terms of challenges that we face. and i, once drew a list of things that unite us. it appears much longer. we don't see eye to eye. and i would submit important for russia and hopefully for the united states. we have progress aid lot through the last three years. reset has brought a lot of new things, a lot of new way of doing things. the commission that was established by the two presidents seems to be producing new ideas, new avenues for, for cooperation, both between the
hamid karzai sits down for his only interview with me while in the united states. we talk about his personal relationship with president obama and even his personal relationship with mitt romney. stand by for that as well. >>> and the man sometimes nicknamed america's supermayor, has made a super gaffe. >>> i'm wolf blitzer in chicago. you're in the situation room. >>> but first, through my exclusive far reaching interview, i just completed only a few minutes ago with the afghan president hamid karzai, it's his only interview while here in the united states. we sat down only moments ago, and he spoke of president obama just minutes before the interview. the three leaders are here for a meeting in chicago. listen to this. >> no, we didn't have a three-way meeting, we had a three-way photograph taking. >> just a photo opportunity? >> why not a meeting? why not have a three-way meeting and discuss the most important issues facing afghanistan, pakistan and the united states. >> it wasn't for us to decide on the three-way meeting. the united states was the host and perhaps they saw it fi
news. we want to welcome our viewers in the united states and around the world. i'm wolf blitzer. you're in "the situation room." >>> this is cnn breaking news. >> we're following the breaking news. dramatic developments. president obama's surprise trip to afghanistan exactly one year after the u.s. raid that killed osama bin laden in neighboring pakistan. less than an hour or so ago we got the first word of his arr e arrival at the bagram air base. he is now in kabul meeting with the afghan president hamid karzai to sign a long-term strategic partnership agreement at a rather precarious time for relations between the two countries. he will then make a televised speech to the united states, indeed to the entire world, in three and a half hours from now at 7:30 p.m. eastern time here in the united states. let's go straight to our white house correspondent brianna keilar. for this president, this is a huge deal. set the scene. >> reporter: this is a big deal, wolf. a trip by the president of the united states to a war zone like afghanistan is extraordinary and this is only the thi
the united states and afghanistan over the next decade. and will include sort of the outline for the withdrawal plan. we expect the president to address the nation and u.s. troops at 7:31 our time. that's a speech that will last for about 10 to 15 minutes, martin. and we will, of course, be carrying that live. president obama has arrived in afghanistan. he is meeting with afghanistan president hamid karzai. of course, this all comes on the one-year anniversary of the killing of osama bin laden. certainly this timing is not coincidental but president obama there to discuss the strategic partnership with the president of afghanistan, including the plan for withdrawal. >> and do you know anything or any detail yet about how this was carried out? because we knew absolutely nothing about it. the president clearly leaving the white house. i mean, i'm assuming that somebody must have known. what do we know about the detail of that? >> well, we know that of course, senior administration officials were aware of this plan. but the white house certainly keeping this a secret throughout
women by double digits and be president of the united states. >> bill: what are the republicans thinking when, for example, like on the violence against women act or the lily led led better act and the federal leave act and all of these issues which do impact just the rights of women to be considered first class citizens i guess in this country. laura, what are they thinking? >> i don't know what they're thinking. a lot of their moves have not been very politically smart lately. but you see them like, for instance, with the violence against women act, republicans put forth a woman to introduce the act sandy adams from florida. she was actually a domestic violence victim. she didn't actually write the bill but they basically boehner chose her and said because you're a woman and you were abused, you're going to sponsor this and it is going to make us look less anti-woman here. we've got all of these republican women that are supporting it so how can it be a war on women. it is a war on democratic ideals. so i t
that people take a look at peel's previous statements. the united states has conducted an operation that killed osama bin laden. >> we have breaking news at this very moment. we understand the president is in afghanistan. this on the first anniversary of the killing of osama bin laden. we understand that he traveled there overnight. there was something of a "meet the press" and media blackout but we are able to confirm the president is indeed in afghanistan. i'm joined now by kristen welker who is at the white house. please tell us what do you know? what have you heard? >> hi there. good afternoon to you. we can tell you that president obama arrived in afghanistan in kabul at 2:39 p.m. our time, which is 11:09 in afghanistan. right now, he is at the afghan presidential palace with president hamid karzai. we're just getting this information so i'll read it to you. he is there to sign the strategic partnership agreement which is essentially going to outline the relationship between the united states and afghanistan over the next decade. and will include sort of the outline for the wit
front of the u.s. capitol, this is half an hour. >> ladies and gentlemen, the president of united states. >> detail, colors. present arms. [silence] >> detail, color guard, right shoulder, order. arm. >> please stand for the assessment of the colors like united states capitol police, and remain standing for our national anthem. [silence] >> detail, color guar guard. present arms. >> we will now have the national anthem by kathy williams. ♪ oh, say, can you see ♪ by the dawn's early light ♪ what so proudly we hailed ♪ at the twilight's last gleaming? ♪ ♪ whose broad stripes and bright stars ♪ ♪ thro' the perilous fight ♪ o'er the ramparts we watched ♪ were so gallantly streaming t ♪ and the rockets red glare ♪ the bombs bursting in air ♪ gave proof through the night ♪ that our flag was still there ♪ ♪ oh, say, does that star-spangled banner yet wave ♪ ♪ o'er the land of the free ♪ and the home of the brave? >> detail, color guard. order, right shoulder, arms. >> please remain standing for the invocation. >> please join me in prayer. our gracious fathe
president of the united states. [applause] >> jim gray has been nominated. >> and scotty bowman from michigan and i nominate lee wrights or vice-president of the united states libertarian nomination. [applause] >> i nominate jim burns for vice-president of the united states. >> jim burns has been nominated. further nominations from the floor? seeing none, i will close -- sorry, i see one more. >> i am mary o'connor from minnesota. i nominate sam sloan for vice- president. >> i am sorry, i have been informed by his secretary that he is not eligible. further nominations? >> i nominate jim gray for vice- president. >> he was already nominated. if you like to nominate someone please come to the microphone. >> i have been informed that nominations are supposed to be in writing, so those who have done the nominating, there are three names that the secretary is already in possession of. the go-ahead and state your nomination, but submitted to the secretary. >> i am from the great state of florida. and nominate -- i nominate nota, none of the above. >> another seconding for jim byrnes. >> se
the gaithersburg book festival we hear from david stew wetter on the third vice president of the united states. his called everyone emperor. he he's introduced by john ashman the founder of the gaithersburg book festival. >> surveys are available at the tend. we hope you enjoy the rest of of your day at the festival. [inaudible conversations] good afternoon, everyone. welcome to the third annual gaithersburg book festival. i'm judd ashman a member of the city council. oop. i hope everyone is all right over there. [inaudible conversations] it is a i have i vibrant diversity that celebrates the support of the cultural arts. we're pleased to bring the event free of charge thanks to the generous support of our sponsors. for our consideration and everyone here, i should say, please silence any devices that make any kind of noise at all. in order keep improving the event. we want your feedback. please grab a survey from the table over here. from the info booth it'll be up on the website as of later today. please help us keep improving the event. if there's time for qa please come to the microphone with t
of real significance to the united states. to do that, we will dedicate 80% of our effort to four major cases. right now they are syria, kenya, north/central america and burma. then we'll have another eight to ten places where we can test new approaches or make a welcome difference by just sending the the right person at the right time. so far i think we're gaining traction in each of our major priority engagements. many of you are working in these places, and we realize that we won't know it all or know best about them, so we hope for your support. in syria we are providing a nontraditional surge to empower and unite a fractured, nonviolent opposition. as the secretary announced, that includes providing nonlethal assistance. we are also working with partners to set up an outpost for the internal opposition to coordinate and communicate with the international community. in kenya we are helping to develop plans to insure peaceful and credible elections a year before the vote. incidentally, kenya is one place where we've seen a potential model for broad cooperation and innovation. in nort
a very solid marker that this case, the chen case, was important to the united states. understand a couple of things. this is a broad important relationship between the united states and china, it's always going to be difficult and complex on a good day. then you throw something like this into the mix and it can have the potential for tensions although, up until today, it appeared the united states and china had worked constructively, intensely, to try to resolve this. go ahead. >> p.j., it sounds like someone is doubling back on the original agreement and/or the terms were not fully understood. chen guangcheng saying he felt he wife was going to be beaten to death if he didn't leave the u.s. embassy. it sounds like he at one point said that the u.s. had not -- was not pro active enough. that certainly doesn't look good. >> well, understand that mr. chen was trying to do something that was unique without precedent. normally the united states tries to work to bring activists out of china where they feel they are threatened. mr. chen specifically had the united states negotiate with
. as the president said, preventing a nuclear iran is in the interest of the united states. we have issued reports, and the most recent one was issued on and.ary 1 and it includes a distinguished panel of four democratic members of congress, admirals' and generals and also experts to area our last report supported the view that the best approached to this challenge is a simultaneous pursuit of a triple track policy, which is of diplomacy, tough sanctions, and a credible and invisible military threat. we also issued a white paper on each of those tracks. i want to highlight one recommendation on each of those tracks, and then i will change it over to mort zuckerman. and the military threat we believe the united states should boost the credibility of its military to air around us nuclear facilities, and we have spelled out how to do so. one element has been selling bunker busters' to israel. we do not advocate an israeli strike, but this will send a strong signal to tehran to negotiate in good faith, encourage other states that the alternative to supporting u.s. sanctions could be military conflict
. and in relation to the united states government, whether it is the clinton administration or bush administration or obama administration, they're probably better understood stood more like francement they're sometime as lined with the united states, sometimes o posed. postly they are just trying to stay out of the way and do their own thing. >> ann bremmer and steve coll when we continue. funding for charlie rose was provided by the following: . >> rose: additional funding provided by these funders:. >> and by bloomberg:. >> from studios in new york city captioning sponsored by rose communications from our studios in new york city, this is charlie rose. >> rose: ian bremmer is here president of eurasia group, his new book every nation for itself, winners and losers in a g-zero world t paints a picture in a world in which no single power is able to take be the responsibility of global leadership. larry summers says everyone who cares about our collective future will need to carefully consider this book's impressive arguments. i'm pleased to have ian bremmer back at this table, welcome. >> hi, cha
geopolitics -- host: oil and gas production in the western hemisphere is booming, with the united states emerging less dependent on supplies from an unstable middle east. vens, nigeria, and mexico. host: southeast michigan. what are gas prices like there, dave? caller: very good. someone saying on your show that prices were falling for the holidays. that's not true here in southeast michigan, which people here like to drive a lot up north. we have a wonderful, beautiful up north. but the prices here average in the low $3.90's. they were a week ago in the mid $3.60, around there. for my employees, it's all the same for them. we're traveling 60 mile an hour round trips and that really hits the pocketbook when you're having to travel every day for week. i'll companies are certainly quick to bring the price down. thanks and have a good holiday. host: it's not our oil that we're talking about, it belongs to oil companies. new hampshire, john on our democrats line joins us. hi. caller: just one note i've acknowledged over the last few weeks. we have a caller on your show, but he was discussing
is the united states didn't have much competition in those days we won the war and japan and europe were not major competitors. but even today germany, other countries like germany, they have a social compact very similar to the one we had. and that means german workers are enjoying the benefits of productivity increases, unemployment is relatively low, and their standard of living is very high, and the very rich take home a much smaller share of the total gains from growth than they do in the united states. >> professor i want to focus on that last issue, because you are exactly correct. you know i agree with you, any importance of unions and the social account that we all believe will help the entirety of our population central to what we should be doing. let's talk about trade in particular, because we have entered a series of multi-lateral and by bilateral trade agreements how can workers compete against labor in the number you hear is 2 to 3 billion additional workers competes against our domestic work force. so that general motors and ford are now invest
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